Where the Waters Turn Black: Yarnsworld Book II

By Benedict Patrick

By Benedict Patrick

*I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*

I knew I would love this story from the first page. It is hard to describe the beauty in this piece, as there is so much. The characters, their lives, their culture, their faith, their journeys—all of it is a culmination of everything you would want in a dark—yet somehow lighthearted—book of fable, folklore, and myth. It has just the right mix of adventure and mystery, friendship and hurt, joy and wonder. It all comes together so well—perfectly woven as if from threads taken from the hem of a robe worn by one of the powerful gods in this story.  

The protagonist here is a young woman named Kaimana who is a musician travelling across the islands with the hopes of making it big. What she’s searching for besides fame, however, is inspiration. Kaimana needs the perfect spark to fuel the magic of her music so she can’t keep herself still for long when she hears rumors of a taniwha living nearby. Taniwha are rumored to be dangerous monsters that have beaten fear into the many Atoll villages. What Kaimana finds, though, is not what she expected at all but it takes her career and her entire life in a new direction.

We get to see a beautiful mixture of rich culture, wild imagination, and adventurous legends put together by Patrick. I’m a huge fan of ‘They Mostly Come Out at Night’ but I must say this work gives it a run for its money. Patrick’s writing is so solid and layered in its beautiful simplicity. I absolutely love the beginning of the book; a simple conversation between a toddler and Kaimana. There isn’t always much description as far as appearances go in Patrick’s writing but it is deliberate, as if letting readers fill in the blanks.

That is an aspect of Patrick’s writing that I am learning to look forward to. There aren’t many books I get to simply read and enjoy while I poke and prod, putting together my review, but this is definitely one that I loved. I don’t think I can truly do any work of Patrick’s justice with a simple review; it is something you must witness for yourself. I ask, from the bottom of my heart, that readers pick up a copy of this book.

If you enjoy books with originality, rich culture, lighthearted adventures, and the mysteries of village folklore, then you will fall in love with this book. I definitely recommend it to fans of dark fiction and those open to mythology and other cultural fiction.

The Book Reviewer Yellow Pages